What belongs in marketing vs. sales


Marketing vs. Sales. There has always been a debate on where the line is between the two. With the advent of modern technology, this line has become blurrier than ever. It can be difficult for companies to know which tools belong to which department and how to allocate resources. We have seen this confusion first hand as we have worked with companies who experience this dilemma.

As a digital marketing and technology company, we know the toolkit better than anyone. We know the nuances that separate various tools and how they can be best utilized. In order to understand which tools belong where it is important to grasp the key differences between marketing and sales in the 21st century

 

Marketing


Traditionally marketing has meant one-way communication from the company to the consumer. Companies would post up billboards or magazine advertisements and consumers would just look at them. This traditional picture has been altered in the digital age as marketers draw on real-time opportunities to talk directly to consumers - and join the conversations consumers have with each other. Tools which try to control and frame this user behaviour fall under the realm of marketing.

Marketing speaks to large groups of people. A television ad could potentially be viewed by millions of people. However, there are now tools which allow marketers to segment users and deliver more tailored content to consumers (this was once what Cable TV meant to the business). The end goal of this, as with all marketing efforts is to identify those people who are interested in a company's product or service. Ideally, it is these identified leads that will be passed to sales. Tools which allow companies to do this segmentation falls under the domain of marketing.

Sales


Sales have always been about 2-way communication between the buyer and the seller. Both parties have a say in the process and there is a human element which can't be ignored. The customer relationship is very important to sales. Customer relationship management (CRM) systems are squarely in the field of sales and help salespeople manage and cultivate business relationships.

Traditionally sales dealt with small numbers of people. A sales person would have to have a direct conversation with each buyer and talk to them about the product and their needs. In some cases this is still true, however, due to the internet and global connectivity, sales people are now able to talk to a larger amount of people. Salespeople can now reach out to leads via email and get additional information about the experience. Tracking tools can inform salespeople when leads click on their emails and workflow tools can automatically generate email templates and automatic processes when leads do certain behaviours - e.g. a notification to have a sales call is sent out when a lead opens an email and downloads an attachment.

Marketing

 

Traditionally marketing has meant one-way communication from the company to the consumer. Companies would post up billboards or magazine advertisements and consumers would just look at them. This traditional picture has been altered in the digital age as marketers draw on real-time opportunities to talk directly to consumers - and join the conversations consumers have with each other. Tools which try to control and frame this user behaviour fall under the realm of marketing.

Marketing speaks to large groups of people. A television ad could potentially be viewed by millions of people. However, there are now tools which allow marketers to segment users and deliver more tailored content to consumers (this was once what Cable TV meant to the business). The end goal of this, as with all marketing efforts is to identify those people who are interested in a company's product or service. Ideally, it is these identified leads that will be passed to sales. Tools which allow companies to do this segmentation falls under the domain of marketing.

 

Sales

Sales have always been about 2-way communication between the buyer and the seller. Both parties have a say in the process and there is a human element which can't be ignored. The customer relationship is very important to sales. Customer relationship management (CRM) systems are squarely in the field of sales and help salespeople manage and cultivate business relationships.

Traditionally sales dealt with small numbers of people. A salesperson would have to have a direct conversation with each buyer and talk to them about the product and their needs. In some cases this is still true, however, due to the internet and global connectivity, sales people are now able to talk to a larger amount of people. Salespeople can now reach out to leads via email and get additional information about the experience. Tracking tools can inform salespeople when leads click on their emails and workflow tools can automatically generate email templates and automatic processes when leads do certain behaviours - e.g. a notification to have a sales call is sent out when a lead opens an email and downloads an attachment.

 

There are some tools which fall into both camps and where they belong depends on how they are used. For example, analytics tools can be used to gather data on marketing automation software as well on sales workflow systems. It can be a very blurry line and the best thing a company can do is sit down with both the marketing and sales departments and decide for themselves what the goals are for sales and marketing and which tools should be used. If there is no clarity on which tools are used, there may be information overload. Data may be present in a variety of different places such as google analytics, a customer relationship management system a content management system, a sales acceleration tool and more. This makes it very difficult to get an accurate picture of what's really going on. In these cases, it is a good idea to have a central place of truth for both sales and marketing.



 

 


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